SELECTED READING

John Brockman [5.1.95]
Topic:

PART ONE

Cronin, Helena. The Ant and the Peacock. New York: Cambridge University Press (1992).

PART ONE

Cronin, Helena. The Ant and the Peacock. New York: Cambridge University Press (1992).

Darwin, Charles R. On the Origin of Species. Cambridge: Harvard University Press (1859/1964).
Dawkins, Richard. The Blind Watchmaker. New York: W.W. Norton (1986).
_____. The Extended Phenotype. New York: Oxford University Press (1982).
_____. River out of Eden. New York: Basic Books (1995).
_____. The Selfish Gene. 2d ed., New York: Oxford University Press (1989).
Dobzhansky, Theodosius. Genetics and the Origin of Species. New York: Columbia University Press (1951).
_____. Mankind Evolving: The Evolution of the Human Species. New Haven: Yale University Press (1962).
Eigen, Manfred. Steps Towards Life. New York: Oxford University Press (1992).
Eldredge, Niles. Fossils. New York: Harry N. Abrams (1991).
_____. The Miner's Canary. New York: Prentice Hall (1991).
_____. The Monkey Business. New York: Washington Square Press (1982).
_____. Reinventing Darwin. New York: John Wiley (1995).
_____. Time Frames: The Rethinking of Darwinian Evolution and the Theory of Punctuated Equilibria. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985).
_____. Unfinished Synthesis. New York: Oxford University Press (1985).
_____, and Stephen J. Gould. "Punctuated Equilibria: An Alternative to Phyletic Gradualism," in T.J.M. Schopf, ed., Models in Paleobiology. San Francisco: Freeman Cooper (1972).
_____, and Marjorie Grene. Interactions. New York: Columbia University Press (1992).
Ewald, Paul W. "Cultural Vectors, Virulence, and the Emergence of Evolutionary Epidemiology." Oxford Surveys in Evolutionary Biology 5 (1988) 215-245.
Fisher, Ronald A. The Genetical Theory of Natural Selection. Oxford: Clarendon Press (1930).
Goldschmidt, Richard. The Material Basis of Evolution. New Haven: Yale University Press (1940).
Gould, Stephen Jay. Bully for Brontosaurus. New York: W.W. Norton (1992).
_____. Ever Since Darwin. New York: W.W. Norton (1977).
_____. The Flamingo's Smile. New York: W.W. Norton (1985).
_____. Hen's Teeth and Horse's Toes. New York: W.W. Norton (1983).
_____. The Mismeasure of Man. New York: W.W. Norton (1981).
_____. Ontogeny and Phylogeny. Cambridge: Harvard University Press (1977).
_____. The Panda's Thumb. New York: W.W. Norton (1980).
_____. Time's Arrow, Time's Cycle: Myth and Metaphor in the Discovery of Geological Time. Cambridge: Harvard University Press (1987).
_____. An Urchin in the Storm. New York: W.W. Norton (1988).
_____. Wonderful Life. New York: W.W. Norton (1989).
_____, and Richard C. Lewontin. "The Spandrels of San Marco and the Panglossian Paradigm: A Critique of the Adaptationist Programme." Proc. Roy. Soc. London B 205 (1979) 581-598.
_____, and Elisabeth S. Vrba. "Exaptation — A Missing Term in the Science of Form." Paleobiology 8 (1982) 4-15.
Haldane, J.B.S. The Causes of Evolution. London: Longmans (1932).
Hamilton, W.D. "The Genetical Evolution of Social Behaviour" (I and II). Journal of Theoretical Biology 7 (1964) 1-52.
_____. "The Moulding of Senescence by Natural Selection." Journal of Theoretical Biology 12 (1966) 12-45.
Hull, David L. "Interactors versus Vehicles," in H.C. Plotkin, ed., The Role of Behavior in Evolution. Cambridge: MIT Press (1988).
Jones, Steve. The Language of the Genes: Biology, History, and the Evolutionary Future. London: HarperCollins (1993).
_____, Robert Martin, and David Pilbeam, eds. The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Evolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (1992).
Lewontin, Richard C., Steven Rose, and Leon J. Kamin. Not In Our Genes. New York: Pantheon (1984).
Lovelock, James. Gaia. New York: Oxford University Press (1979).
Margulis, Lynn. Early Life. Boston: Jones & Bartlett (1981).
_____. The Origin of Eukaryotic Cells. New Haven: Yale University Press (1970).
_____. Symbiosis in Cell Evolution. 2d ed., New York: W.H. Freeman (1993).
_____, and Dorion Sagan. Microcosmos. New York: Simon & Schuster (1986).
_____. Mystery Dance. New York: Summit Books (1991).
_____. Origins of Sex. New Haven: Yale University Press (1986).
_____, and Karlene V. Schwartz. Five Kingdoms: An Illustrated Guide to the Phyla of Life on Earth. 2d ed., San Francisco: W.H. Freeman (1988).
Maynard Smith, John. Did Darwin Get It Right? London: Chapman & Hall (1989).
_____. Evolution and the Theory of Games. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (1982).
_____. The Evolution of Sex. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (1978).
_____. The Problems of Biology. Oxford: Oxford University Press (1986).
Mayr, Ernst. The Growth of Biological Thought. Cambridge: Harvard University Press (1982).
_____. Toward a New Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge: Harvard University Press (1988).
Medawar, Peter. The Limits of Science. New York: Harper & Row (1984).
_____. Memoir of a Thinking Radish. Oxford: Oxford University Press (1988).
Nesse, Randolph, M.D., and George C. Williams. Why We Get Sick. New York: Times Books (1995).
Simpson, George Gaylord. The Major Features of Evolution. New York: Columbia University Press (1953).
_____. The Meaning of Evolution. New Haven: Yale University Press (1949).
_____. Tempo and Mode in Evolution. New York: Columbia University Press (1944).
Snow, C.P. The Two Cultures. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (1993).
Sober, Elliott. The Nature of Selection. Cambridge: MIT Press (1984).
Stanley, Steven M. Children of the Ice Age. New York: Crown (1995).
_____. The New Evolutionary Timetable. New York: Basic Books (1981).
Stebbins, G.L. Variation and Evolution in Plants. New York: Columbia University Press (1950).
Sturtevant, A.H. "On the Effects of Selection on Social Insects." Quarterly Review of Biology 13 (1938) 74-76.
Thompson, D'Arcy W. On Growth and Form. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (1917).
Trivers, Robert. Social Evolution. Menlo Park CA: Benjamin/Cummings (1985).
Vrba, Elisabeth S., and Niles Eldredge. "Individuals, Hierarchies, and Processes: Towards a More Complete Evolutionary Theory."Paleobiology 10 (1984) 146-171.
Waddington, C.H. The Evolution of an Evolutionist. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press (1975).
_____. The Nature of Life. London: Allen & Unwin (1962).
_____. The Strategy of the Genes. London: Allen & Unwin (1957).
Weismann, August. "The All-Sufficiency of Natural Selection: A Reply to Herbert Spencer." Contemporary Review 64 (1893) 309-338, 596-610.
Williams, George C. Adaptation and Natural Selection: A Critique of Some Current Evolutionary Thought. Princeton: Princeton University Press (1966).
_____. Natural Selection: Domains, Levels, and Challenges. New York: Oxford University Press (1992).
_____. Sex and Evolution. Princeton: Princeton University Press (1975).
Wilson, Edward O. The Diversity of Life. Cambridge: Harvard University Press (1992).
_____. On Human Nature. Cambridge: Harvard University Press (1978).
_____. Sociobiology: The New Synthesis. Cambridge: Harvard University Press (1975).
Wright, Sewall. "Adaptation and Selection," in Genetics, Paleontology, and Evolution, G.L. Jepson, E. Mayr, and G.G. Simpson, eds. Princeton: Princeton University Press (1949).
_____. "Evolution in Mendelian Populations." Genetics 16 (1931) 97-159.
_____. "Tempo and Mode in Evolution: A Critical Review." Ecology 26 (1945) 415-419.
Wynne-Edwards, V.C. Animal Dispersion in Relation to Social Behaviour. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd (1962).

 

PART TWO

 

Chomsky, Noam. Knowledge of Language. New York: Praeger (1986).
Dennett, Daniel C. Brainstorms. Montgomery VT: Bradford Books (1978).
_____. Consciousness Explained. Boston: Little, Brown (1991).
_____. Content and Consciousness. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul (1969).
_____. Elbow Room: The Varieties of Free Will Worth Wanting. Cambridge: MIT Press/Bradford (1984).
_____. The Intentional Stance. Cambridge: MIT Press/Bradford (1987).
Dreyfus, Hubert. What Computers Can't Do. 2d ed., New York: Harper & Row (1979).
_____, and S.E. Dreyfus. Minds Over Matter. New York: The Free Press (1986).
Hofstadter, Douglas R., and Daniel C. Dennett. The Mind's I. New York: Bantam (1982).
Humphrey, Nicholas. Consciousness Regained. Oxford: Oxford University Press (1983).
_____. A History of the Mind. New York: Simon & Schuster (1992).
_____. The Inner Eye. London: Faber & Faber (1986).
_____. "`Interest' and `Pleasure': Two Determinants of a Monkey's Visual Preferences." Perception 1 (1972) 395-416.
Jacob, François. The Possible and the Actual. Seattle: University of Washington Press (1982).
Levelt, Willem. Speaking. Cambridge: MIT Press/Bradford (1989).
Maturana, Humberto D., and Francisco J. Varela. Autopoiesis and Cognition: The Realization of the Living. Boston: D. Reidel (1980).
_____. The Tree of Knowledge. Boston: New Science Library (1987).
Minsky, Marvin. The Society of Mind. New York: Simon & Schuster (1986).
_____, and Seymour Papert. Perceptrons. Rev. ed., Cambridge: MIT Press (1987).
Moravec, Hans. Mind Children: The Future of Robot and Human Intelligence. Cambridge: Harvard University Press (1988).
Papert, Seymour. Mindstorms. New York: Harper & Row (1981).
Penrose, Roger. The Emperor's New Mind: Concerning Computers, Minds, and the Laws of Physics. New York: Oxford University Press (1989).
_____. Shadows of the Mind: A Search for the Missing Science of Consciousness. New York: Oxford University Press (1994).
Pinker, Steven. The Language Instinct. New York: William Morrow (1994).
_____. Learnability and Cognition: The Acquisition of Argument Structure. Cambridge: MIT Press (1989).
____, and Paul Bloom. "Natural Language and Natural Selection." Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1990) 707-784.
Schank, Roger. The Connoisseur's Guide to the Mind. New York: Summit Books (1991).
_____. Tell Me a Story. New York: Scribners (1990).
_____, and R. Abelson. Scripts, Plans, Goals, and Understanding: An Inquiry into Human Knowledge Structures. Hillsdale NJ: Erlbaum (1977).
_____, and Peter Childers. The Cognitive Computer. Reading MA: Addison-Wesley (1988).
_____. The Creative Attitude: Learning to Ask and Answer the Right Questions. New York: Macmillan (1988).
Searle, John. Minds, Brains, and Science. Cambridge: Harvard University Press (1984).
_____. The Rediscovery of the Mind. Cambridge: MIT Press (1992).
Varela, Francisco J. Principles of Biological Autonomy. New York: Elsevier North Holland (1979).
_____, Evan Thompson, and Eleanor Rosch. The Embodied Mind. Cambridge: MIT Press (1992).

 

PART THREE

 

Barrow, John D., and Frank J. Tipler. The Anthropic Cosmological Principle. New York: Oxford University Press (1986).
Davies, Paul. The Cosmic Blueprint. New York: Simon & Schuster (1989).
_____. The Edge of Infinity. New York: Simon & Schuster (1981).
_____. God and the New Physics. New York: Simon & Schuster (1983).
_____. The Last Three Minutes: Conjectures about the Ultimate Fate of the Universe. New York: Basic Books (1994).
_____, ed. The New Physics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (1989).
_____. "A New Science of Complexity." New Scientist 26 November 1988.
_____. Other Worlds. London: Dent (1980).
_____. The Physics of Time Asymmetry. Berkeley: University of California Press (1974).
_____. Space and Time in the Modern Universe. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1977.
_____. Superforce. New York: Simon & Schuster (1984).
_____, and John Gribbin. The Matter Myth. New York: Simon & Schuster (1992).
Gribbin, John, and Martin Rees. Cosmic Coincidences: Dark Matter, Mankind, and Anthropic Cosmology. New York: Bantam (1989).
Guth, Alan. The Inflationary Universe. Reading: Addison-Wesley (1997).
Hawking, Stephen W. A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes. New York: Bantam (1988).
Pagels, Heinz R. The Cosmic Code: Quantum Physics As the Language of Nature. New York: Simon & Schuster (1982).
_____. Perfect Symmetry. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985).
Rees, Martin. Our Home Universe. New York: Oxford (1997).
Smolin, Lee. The Life of The Cosmos. New York: Oxford (1997).
Smoot, George, and Keay Davidson. Wrinkles in Time. New York: William Morrow (1994).
Weinberg, Steven. Dreams of a Final Theory. New York: Pantheon (1992).
_____. The First Three Minutes: A Modern View of the Origin of the Universe. Updated ed., New York: Basic Books (1988).

 

PART FOUR

 

Farmer, J. Doyne, Tomaso Toffoli, and Stephen Wolfram, eds. "Cellular automata." Physica 10D Amsterdam (1984).
_____, eds. "Evolution, Games, and Learning: Models for Adaptation in Machines and Nature." Physica 22D Amsterdam (1986).
Gell-Mann, Murray. The Quark and the Jaguar. New York: W.H. Freeman (l994).
Holland, John H. Adaptation in Natural and Artificial Systems. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press (1975).
Kauffman, Stuart A. Origins of Order: Self-Organization and Selection in Evolution. New York: Oxford University Press (1993).
_____, and George Johnson. At Home in the Universe. New York: Oxford University Press (1995).
Langton, Christopher G., ed. Artificial Life. Reading MA: Addison-Wesley (1989).
_____, Charles Taylor, J. Doyne Farmer, and Steen Rasmussen, eds. Artificial Life II. Reading MA: Addison-Wesley (1992).
Pagels, Heinz R. Dreams of Reason: The Computer and the Rise of the Sciences of Complexity. New York: Simon & Schuster (1988).
Toffoli, Tomaso, and Norman Margolus. Cellular Automata Machines. Cambridge: MIT Press (1987).

 

PART FIVE

 

Hillis, W. Daniel. The Connection Machine. Cambridge: MIT Press (1985).
_____. "Intelligence as an Emergent Behavior," in Artificial Intelligence, Stephen Graubard, ed. Cambridge: MIT Press (1988).


INDEX

accelerators
accidents
cosmic
frozen
adaptation
language as
two meanings of
see also natural selection
Adaptation and Natural Selection: A Critique of Some Current Evolutionary Thought (Williams)
adaptationism
adaptive complex systems, see complex systems
Adler, Mortimer
AIDS
algorithms
bottom-up
of Darwin
top-down
amino acids
anima
Animal Dispersion in Relation to Social Behavior (Wynne-Edwards)
Ant and the Peacock, The (Cronin)
anthropic principle
strong and weak forms of
anthropology
aphasia
Appleyard, Brian
architecture
art
French impressionism
Arthur, Brian
artificial intelligence (AI)
connectionist programs
language and
magic-bullet theory and
neural networks
Pandemonium program
artificial life (AL)
Artificial Life (Langton)
Ashtekar, Abhay
Aspects of the Theory of Syntax (Chomsky)
astronomy
astrophysics
high-energy
At Home in the Universe (Johnson and Kauffman)
atmospheric gases
atomism
attractors
autoimmune diseases
autopoiesis (self-production)
Autopoiesis and Cognition: The Realization of the Living (Maturana and Varela)
Axelrod, Bob
bacteria
Bagley, Rik
Ballivet, Marc
Barbour, Julian
Bass, Thomas A.
beauty
Benzer, Seymour
big bang
biological determinism
biological form
biological rhythms
biology
complexity in; see also complexity
engineering and
five kingdoms concept and
functionalism in
and informational domain vs. material domain
new
role of physics in
shift of values in
structuralism in
symbiogenesis and
see also evolution; genes
birds
wings of
Birrell, Nick
black holes
Blau, Steven
blindness, from destruction of visual cortex
blindsight
Blind Watchmaker, The (Dawkins)
blind-watchmaker computer program
Bloom, Paul
Bohr, Niels
Boltzmann, Ludwig
bowers
brain
as collection of kludges
computer model of
evolution of
language and
nervous system and
self and
see also consciousness; mind
Brainstorms (Dennett)
Brand, Stewart
Brief History of Time, A (Hawking)
Brooks, Rodney
Brown, Donald
Buddhism
Bully for Brontosaurus (Gould)
Bunch, Tim
butterfly effect

Cain, Arthur
Calvinism
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Evolution, The (Jones, Martin, and Pilbeam, eds.)
capitalism
Carnot, Sadi
Carr, Bernard
Cartesian Theater
case-based reasoning
cells
cellular automata
Cemin, Saint Clair
Cepaea nemoralis
chance
chaos
chemistry
Chesterton, G. K.
Childers, Peter
Chomsky, Noam
chronobiology
cistrons
cladists
Clarke, Bryan
Clausius, Rudolf
COBE satellite
Cohen, Jack
Coleman, Sidney
competition and conflict, in nature
complexity
effective
potential
of universe
complex systems
order-for-free and
phase transitions and
see also order; self-organization
computation
computer(s), computer models
artificial intelligence, see artificial intelligence
artificial life
blind-watchmaker program
brain as
complex adaptive systems
evolving programs in
microtubules and
parallel
quantum
in schools
software rot and
thinking
vision-guided
conceptual dependency
Connection Machine, The (Hillis)
Connoisseur's Guide to the Mind, The (Schank)
consciousness
evolution of
origin of
reflexive (self-awareness)
sensations and
thick moment of
Consciousness Explained (Dennett)
Consciousness Regained (Humphrey)
Content and Consciousness (Dennett)
context of justification, context of discovery vs.
cooperative behavior, in nature
Copeland, Herbert F.
Cosmic Blueprint, The (Davies)
Cosmic Coincidences: Dark Matter, Mankind, and Anthropic Cosmology (Gribbin and Rees)
cosmogony
cosmology
see also universe
Cowan, George
Cowan, Jack
Coyne, Jerry
creationism
Creative Attitude, The: Learning to Ask and Answer the Right Questions (Schank and Childers)
creativity
of life
types of
Crick, Francis
critical systems
Cronin, Helena
Crow, James F.
Crutchfield, Jim
cultural memes
culture
cummings, e.e.
cybernetics
Cybernetics (Wiener)

Danielli, James F.
dark matter
Darwin, Charles
algorithm of
genetics and
Darwinism
attacks upon
competition and conflict in
medicine and
neo-Darwinism
on other planets
selfish gene theory and
social
strict; see also adaptationism
theology and
ultra-Darwinism
see also adaptation; evolution; genes; natural selection
Davies, Paul
on Gell-Mann
on Smolin
Dawkins, Richard
on Dennett
on Farmer
on Goodwin
on Jones
on Langton
on Margulis
on Minsky
on Penrose
on Williams
death
Degler, Carl
Dennett, Daniel C.
on Dawkins
on Eldredge
on Gell-Mann
on Goodwin
on Gould
on Hillis
on Humphrey
on Kauffman
on Langton
on Margulis
on Minsky
on Penrose
on Pinker
on Schank
on Varela
on Williams
de Sitter, Willem
Deutsch, David
DeWitt, Bryce
Dicke, Robert
Dirac, P.A.M.
diseases
autoimmune
dynamic
diversity, genetic
DNA
extranuclear
see also genes
Dobzhansky, Theodosius
Dover, Gabriel
Dreyfus, Hubert
Drosophila
drug addiction
dynamic memory
Dynamic Memory (Schank)

Early Life (Margulis)
economics
ecosystem(s)
Earth as
virtual, see artificial life
Eddington, Arthur
education
university
Edwards v. Aguillard
Eigen, Manfred
Einstein, Albert
Elbow Room: The Varieties of Free Will Worth Wanting (Dennett)
Eldredge, Niles
on Dawkins
on Gould
on Humphrey
on Kauffman
on Margulis
on Varela
on Williams
Embodied Mind, The (Rosch, Thompson, and Varela)
embryology
evolution and
kaleidoscopic
emergence
emergent selves (virtual identities)
Emerson, Alfred
emotions
Emperor's New Mind, The: Concerning Computers, Minds, and the Laws of Physics (Penrose)
Encyclopedia Britannica
endosymbiosis, see symbiosis, symbiogenesis
energy conservation, inflationary universe and
engineering:
biology and
reverse
esthetics
Eudemonic Pie, The (Bass)
eukaryotic cells
evolution
artificial life and; see also artificial life
biological form and
of brain
chance in
of computer programs
of consciousness
cultural
as a dance
denial of
of development
discontinuity in
of evolvability
and informational domain vs. material domain
limited perspective in study of
long-term events in
progress in
punctuated equilibria in
role of death in
of senescence
symbiogenesis in
teaching of, in schools
of universe
see also adaptation; Darwinism; genes; natural selection
Evolution
Ewald, Paul
exaptation
Extended Phenotype, The (Dawkins)
extinctions

Fadiman, Clifton
Farhi, Edward
Farmer, J. Doyne
on Gell-Mann
on Gould
on Kauffman
on Langton
Feynman, Richard
Finkelstein, David
Fischler, Willy
Fisher, R. A.
Five Kingdoms: An Illustrated Guide to the Phyla of Life on Earth (Margulis and Schwartz)
five kingdoms concept
Flamingo's Smile, The (Gould)
Flores, Fernando
Fontana, Walter
form, biological
Forster, E. M.
fossils
Fossils (Eldredge)
Fredkin, Edward
French impressionism
Freud, Sigmund
fruit flies

Gaia hypothesis
galactic clusters
galaxies
Galton, Francis
Gambini, Rodolfo
Gardner, Martin
gases, atmospheric
Gell-Mann, Murray
on Farmer
on Goodwin
on Gould
on Hillis
on Langton
on Penrose
on Schank
on Smolin
genes
and cause of form
extended phenotypes and
and informational domain vs. material domain
physics and
as replicators
selfish
viruses compared with
see also DNA; natural selection
genetic diversity
genetic imprinting
genetics
population (neo-Darwinism)
Genetics and The Origin of Species (Dobzhansky)
genomes
genotypes
Gibbs, Josiah Willard
Glass, Leon
God
see also religion
God and the New Physics (Davies)
Gödel, Kurt
theorem of
Goodwin, Brian
on Dawkins
on Dennett
on Farmer
on Gould
on Kauffman
on Varela
Gould, Stephen Jay
on Eldredge
on Goodwin
on Jones
on Kauffman
on Pinker
on Williams
gradualism
gravitons
gravity
black holes and
supergravity
gravity, quantum
nonperturbative
Grene, Marjorie
Gribbin, John
group selection
Guendelman, Eduardo
Guth, Alan
on Davies
on Gell-Mann
on Penrose
on Rees
on Smolin
Guven, Jemal

Haig, David
Haldane, J.B.S.
Hall, John
Hameroff, Stuart
Hamilton, William D.
Hartle, Jim
Hawking, Stephen
Hebb, Donald
Hebb synapses
Heisenberg, Werner
Henry VIII, King of England
Hilbert's tenth problem
Hillis, W. Daniel
on Dawkins
on Dennett
on Eldredge
on Farmer
on Kauffman
on Langton
on Margulis
on Penrose
on Pinker
on Schank
on Varela
History of the Mind, A (Humphrey)
HIV
Hofstadter, Douglas R.
holism
Holism (Smuts)
Holland, John
Hopfield, John
How the Leopard Changed Its Spots (Goodwin)
Hoyle, Fred
Hubble, Edwin
Hubel, David
Hull, David
Human Universals (Brown)
Hume, David
Humphrey, Nicholas
on Dennett
on Goodwin
on Gould
on Kauffman
on Penrose
on Rees
Hut, Piet

identities, virtual (emergent selves)
"Illusion of Beauty, The" (Humphrey)
immune system
autoimmune diseases and
inflationary universe
Inflationary Universe, The (Guth)
Inner Eye, The (Humphrey)
insects, social
intellectuals
literary
role of
intelligence
artificial, see artificial intelligence
double dissociation and
problem-solving
see also learning; mind
Intentional Stance, The (Dennett)
interactors (vehicles)
intuition pumps
Isham, C. J.

Jacob, François
Jacoby, Russell
jargon
Jeans, James
Johnson, George
Jones, Steve
on Dawkins
on Goodwin
on Gould
Jones, Steve (cont.)
on Humphrey
on Penrose
Jones' balls

Kant, Immanuel
Kauffman, Stuart
on Dawkins
on Farmer
on Gell-Mann
on Gould
on Langton
on Varela
Kauffman models
kin selection
kinship
Kluver, Heinrich

Lamarck, Jean-Baptiste
Langton, Christopher G.
on Farmer
on Gell-Mann
on Hillis
on Varela
language
as adaptation
aphasia and
brain and
Chomsky and
creolization and
double dissociation and
erroneous views on
as evolutionary by-product
as instinct
interest in
learning of
memory and
scientific jargon
sign
specific language impairment and
speech and
universality of
universality of design of
Language Instinct, The (Pinker)
Language Learnability and Language Development (Pinker)
Language of the Genes: Biology, History, and the Evolutionary Future (Jones)
Lapedes, Alan
Last Intellectuals, The (Jacoby)
Last Three Minutes, The (Davies)
Learnability and Cognition (Pinker)
learning
artificial intelligence and
of language
negative expertise and
in schools
Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm
Levelt, Willem
Levin, Bernard
Lewontin, Richard
Licklider, Joseph
life:
artificial
origin of
Life of The Cosmos, The: A New View of Cosmology, Particle Physics, and the Meaning of Quantum Physics (Smolin)
Linde, Andrei
Linnaeus, Carolus
Lovelock, James E.
Luck, David

McCarthy, John
McCulloch, Warren
McGill, Jim
Margulis, Lynn
on Dawkins
on Eldredge
on Goodwin
on Varela
on Williams
Martin, Robert
Marx, Karl
Mathematical Biophysics (Rashevsky)
mathematics
Matiyasevich, Yuri
Matter Myth, The (Davies and Gribbin)
Maturana, Humberto
Mayr, Ernst
Medawar, Peter B.
medicine
Darwinian
see also diseases
memes
cultural
memory
dynamic
language and
memory-organization packets (MOPs)
Mendel, Gregor Johann
Mereschkovsky, Konstantin S.
metabolism-replicator relationship
Microcosmos (Margulis and Sagan)
microtubules
microwave background radiation
Miller, George
Miller, Stanley
mind
neural-network models of
rationalist
scripts in
self and
see also brain; consciousness; language; learning; memory
Mind's I, The (Dennett and Hofstadter)
Miner's Canary, The (Eldredge)
Minsky, Marvin
on Dawkins
on Dennett
on Gell-Mann
on Hillis
on Gould
on Penrose
on Schank
Mismeasure of Man, The (Gould)
mitochondria
molecules
right-handedness of
synthesis of
Monet, Claude
monkeys:
blind
esthetic preferences of
Monod, Jacques
Moravec, Hans
Morgan, Daniel
Morgan, Thomas H.
Morowitz, Harold
morphogenesis
hydrodynamics compared with
morphology
morphospace
motility proteins
Moylin, Donna
Muller, H. J.
mutation (variation), random
mutons
Mystery Dance (Margulis and Sagan)

"Natural Language and Natural Selection" (Pinker and Bloom)
natural selection
disease and
embryology and
as explanation for all traits
Gaia hypothesis and
gene
natural selection (cont.)
group
hierarchies (levels) in
and informational domain vs. material domain
intelligence and
kin and
and order-for-free
organism's push against
paleontologists' skepticism of
power and importance of
random mutation and
spandrel principle and
trait-group
of universes
see also adaptation; Darwinism; evolution; genes
Natural Selection: Domains, Levels, and Challenges (Williams)
Natural Selection (Williams)
Nature
nature, urban vs. country view of
negative expertise
nervous system
Nesse, Randolph
neural networks
neurons
microtubules and
Newell, Allen
Newton, Isaac
Nielsen, Holgar
Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm

Oettinger, Anthony
omega
On Growth and Form (Thompson)
Ontogeny and Phylogeny (Gould)
ontology
Ontology and Phylogeny (Gould)
order
spontaneous (order-for-free)
see also self-organization
Origin of Eukaryotic Cells, The (Margulis)
"Origin of Mitosing [Eukaryotic] Cells, The" (Margulis)
Origin of Species, The (Darwin)
Origins of Order: Self-Organization and Selection in Evolution (Kauffman)
Origins of Sex (Margulis and Sagan)
Other Worlds (Davies)
Our Home Universe (Rees)

Packard, Norman
Pagels, Heinz
paleontology
Paley, William
Pandemonium
Papert, Seymour
paradigms, in science
Paramecium aurelia
Partridge, Linda
Penrose, Roger
on Dennett
on Smolin
Penzias, Arno
perceptrons
Perceptrons (Minsky and Papert)
Perelson, Alan
phase transitions
phenotypes
extended
philosophy
jargon problem in
science as
phylogeny
physics
classical
particle
particle, standard model of
philosophy and
quantum, see quantum theory
relativity
role of, in biology
unified theory of
physics envy
Physics of Time Asymmetry, The (Davies)
Piaget, Jean
Pilbeam, David
Pinker, Steven
on Dawkins
on Dennett
on Gould
on Minsky
on Penrose
on Schank
on Williams
Pitts, Walter
Plato
play
plectics
Poggio, Tomaso
Polchinski, Joseph
Polyakov, Alexander
popularizers
Prediction Company
Principles of Biological Autonomy (Varela)
prokaryotes (prokaryotic cells)
proposition calculus
proteins
psychology
punctuated equilibria

quantum computers
Quantum Concepts in Space and Time (Isham and Penrose, eds.)
quantum fields
Quantum Fields in Curved Space (Birrell and Davies)
quantum gravity
nonperturbative
Quantum Gravity : A Second Oxford Symposium (Isham, Penrose, and Sciama, eds.)
quantum measurement
quantum theory
quantum universe
Quark and the Jaguar, The: Adventures in the Simple and the Complex (Gell-Mann)
quarks

radiation:
acceleration
microwave background
randomness
random variation (mutation)
Rashevsky, Nicholas
Rasmussen, Steen
Raup, Dave
Ray, Tom
reality
reasoning
case-based
recons
reductionism
greedy
hierarchical
Rees, Martin
on Davies
on Gell-Mann
Reinventing Darwin (Eldredge)
relational point of view
relativity
religion
anthropic principle and
Darwinism and
see also God
replicators
metabolism and
reproduction:
optimal-resource-allocation model and
sexual
reverse engineering
rhythms, biological
Rindler, W.
River out of Eden (Dawkins)
Roberts, Larry
robots
Robson, Simon
Rosch, Eleanor
Rosenblatt, Frank
Rovelli, Carlo
Royal Society:
motto of
symposium of
Russell, Bertrand
Ryle, Gilbert

Sagan, Dorion
Salthe, Stan
San Marco
spandrels of
Santa Fe Institute
Schank, Roger
on Dennett
on Hillis
on Minsky
on Penrose
Schopf, Tom
Schwartz, John
Schwartz, Karlene V.
Sciama, Dennis W.
science
humanities vs.
ignorance of, by literary people
misapplications of
as philosophy
postmodern
as public culture
of qualities, vs. science of quantities
relevance of
science fiction
scientists
backlash against
books by
Gell-Mann on
as popularizers
third culture and
scripts
Searle, John
selection, see natural selection
self
selfless
see also consciousness
Selfish Gene, The (Dawkins)
self-organization
of universe
see also order
self-production (autopoiesis)
Selfridge, Oliver
selves, emergent (virtual identities)
sensations
skeuomorphic features of
Sex and Evolution (Williams)
sexual reproduction
Shadows of the Mind: A Search for the Missing Science of Consciousness (Penrose)
Shakespeare, William
Shannon, Claude
Sharp, Dave
Shaw, J. C.
Shaw, Robert
Sheppard, Phillip
Sidorowich, Sid
Simberloff, Dan
Simon, Herbert
simplicity
Simpson, George Gaylord
Skinner, B. F.
Slagle, Jim
slugs
Smith, John Maynard
Smith, Peter Godfrey
Smolin, Lee
on Gell-Mann
on Guth
on Margulis
on Penrose
on Rees
Smoot, George
Smuts, Jan
snails
Snow, C. P.
Sober, Elliott
Society of Mind, The (Minsky)
society-of-mind theory
sociobiology
Sociobiology (Wilson)
Southern, Ed
space
loop structure of
spin networks and
twistor theory and
wormholes in
"Spandrels of San Marco and the Panglossian Paradigm: A Critique of the Adaptationist Program" (Gould and Lewontin)
species
as individuals
selection (sorting)
specific language impairment (SLI)
speech
see also language
Spencer, Herbert
Sperber, Dan
spin networks
Spinors and Space-time (Penrose and Rindler)
spontaneous symmetry breaking
Stanley, Steven
stars
steady-state theory
Stebbins, Ledyard
"Steps Toward Artificial Intelligence" (Minsky)
Steps Towards Life (Eigen)
Stewart, Ian
Stochastic Neural Analog Reinforcement Calculator (SNARC)
string theory (superstrings)
structuralism, in biology
Sturtevant, A. H.
Superforce (Davies)
supergravity
symbiosis, symbiogenesis
Symbiosis in Cell Evolution (Margulis)
symmetry
synthesis
Syntopicon, The (Adler)

Taylor, Brian
Techniques of Differential Topology in Relativity (Penrose)
Tell Me A Story (Schank)
Tempo and Mode in Evolution (Simpson)
theme-organization packets (TOPs)
thermodynamic systems
Thinking Machines Corporation
third culture
Thom, René
Thompson, D'Arcy
Thompson, Evan
tiling
time
arrow of
spin networks and
travel in
twistor theory and
Time Frames: The Rethinking of Darwinian Evolution and the Theory of Punctuated Equilibria and Unfinished Synthesis (Eldredge)
Tinbergen, Niko
Toffoli, Tomas
topology
Tree of Knowledge, The (Maturana and Varela)
Trivers, Robert
tubulin
Turing, Alan
twistor theory
Two Cultures, The (Snow)

Understanding the Present (Appleyard)
unified theory
universe
anthropic principle and
big-bang theory of
black holes in
collapse of
complexity of
creation of
dark matter in
definitions of
density of matter in
evolution of
expansion of
inflationary
initial singularity of
meta-universe (ensemble of universes)
microwave background radiation in
natural selection and
origin of
quantum
self-organization of
simplicity and uniformity of
steady-state theory of
three-part history of
white holes in
wormholes in
universities
Unruh, Bill
Urey, Harold

vaccines
AIDS
vacuums
false
Varela, Francisco
on Dennett
on Farmer
on Goodwin
on Gould
on Hillis
on Humphrey
on Kauffman
on Langton
on Margulis
on Minsky
on Penrose
on Schank
vehicles (interactors)
virtual identities (emergent selves)
viruses
"Vision in a Monkey without Striate Cortex" (Weiskrantz and Humphrey)
visual cortex, destruction of
vitalism
von Neumann, John
Vrba, Elisabeth

Waddington, C. H.
Wallace, Alfred Russel
Wallin, Ivan Emanuel
Watson, James
Weinberg, Steven
Weiskrantz, Larry
Weismann, August
Welles, Sam
Wendroff, Burton
What Mad Pursuit (Crick)
Wheeler, John Archibald
Whitehead, Alfred North
white holes
Whittaker, Robert H.
Why We Get Sick (Nesse and Williams)
Wiener, Norbert
Wiesel, Torsten
Williams, George C.
on Dawkins
on Eldredge
on Gould
on Margulis
on Pinker
Wilson, David Sloan
Wilson, E. O.
Wilson, Robert
Winfree, Arthur
Winograd, Terry
Wolfram, Stephen
Wonderful Life (Gould)
wormholes
time travel and
Wright, Sewall
Wynne-Edwards, V. C. 


BACK COVER

"John Brockman is the Michael Ovitz of the new intellectual elite."

— PHIL LEGGIERE, WIRED
 
Thirty-five years ago, C.P. Snow, in a now famous essay, wrote about the polarization of the ""two cultures" — literary intellectuals on the one hand, and scientists on the other. Although he hoped for the emergence of a "third culture" that would bridge the gap, it is only recently that science has changed the intellectual landscape
 
Brockman's thesis that science is emerging as the intellectual center of our society is brought to life vividly in The Third Culture, which weaves together the voices of some of today's most influential scientific figures, including:
 
Stephen Jay Gould and Richard Dawkins on the implications of evolution
 
Steven Pinker, Marvin Minsky, Daniel C. Dennett, and Roger Penrose on how the mind works
 
Murray Gell-Mann and Stuart Kauffman on the new sciences of complexity
 
The Third Culture is an honest picture of science in action. It is at once stimulating, challenging, and riveting.

"A rousing read, full of bloodthirsty intellectual combat....What a rich and savory brew it is — biologists, physicists, philosophers, cognitive scientists, computer scientists — you hear their voices, their spoken voices, in the terms with which they talk to (and about) each other."
— STEWART BRAND

"Fascinating...reading The Third Culture is ... Like playing tennis with someone who's better than you are. It will really make you stretch those mental muscles."
— JILL SAPINSLEY MOONEY, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
 
 
JOHN BROCKMAN, president of Edge Foundation and founder of the Reality Club, is a writer and literary agent. 

Back to Contents

Excerpted from The Third Culture: Beyond the Scientific Revolution by John Brockman (Simon & Schuster, 1995) . Copyright © 1995 by John Brockman. All rights reserved.